Scorecard Essentials

After you've run a check, you can view a Scorecard that scores your content based on the types of issues that you're checking for. You also get an overall Acrolinx Score when you check the entire document. To see your Scorecard, click on your Acrolinx Score at the top right of the Sidebar or click Scorecard in the slide-out menu.

On the Scorecard, you can see different sections that help you to analyze your content. When reviewing your Scorecard, keep in mind that Acrolinx displays some sections only if the corresponding checking option was selected for the check. You also get a different view, the Selection Scorecard, when you check a selection. The Scorecard displays a separate section for each issue type. Each of these sections contains detailed information about the found issues as well as suggestions on how to resolve the issue. For issues that you can only edit directly in the text you'll see a padlock icon next to the found issue.

SectionDescription
Acrolinx ScoreThe overall Acrolinx Score for your content. If you're curious about how it's calculated, check out Configure How Acrolinx Scores Are Calculated.
Summary
Scores that show you how well you did for each of the issue types. You only get scores for the issue types that you've selected in your Acrolinx options.

Metrics

The metrics show you scores for each of the characteristics that make up the tone of your content. Click below to get more information on each index. 


 Clarity Index

Clarity Index tells you how clear your text is.

Sentence length and syllables per word don’t tell the whole story. So, it also looks at linguistic factors: embedded sentences, complex verb forms, passives, difficult words, and much more.

The index ranges between 0 and 100. You can interpret the values as follows:

80–100Very simple to read
60–80Clear
40–60Moderately clear
20–40Unclear
0–20Very difficult to read
 Informality index

Informality index tells you how informal your text is.

Informal writing sounds a lot like how we speak. It’s relaxed and colloquial. You address the reader in a casual way. For example, marketing text for a hip product would probably be informal. On the formal end of the spectrum would typically be legal papers or official government documents.

If you use a lot of verbs and pronouns relative to the number of nouns and adjectives, we’ll tend to score it as informal.

We also look at specific expressions. For example, Latin expressions come across as formal, while slang is informal.

An occasional sentence fragment will raise your Informality index.

The index ranges between 0 and 100. You can interpret the values as follows:

80–100Chummy
60–80Informal
40–60Neutral
20–40Formal
0–20Stilted
 Liveliness index

Liveliness index tells you how lively your text is.

Lively text is exciting and compelling. It engages the reader. How lively to write comes down to how you want your audience to see you. You might aim for a very lively blog post about a new and exciting topic. But lively texts can be inappropriate depending on the text type!

If you write a lot of questions, exclamations, and quotations, we’ll tend to score it as lively. Addressing the reader also lifts the index, as does referring to yourself. Your Liveliness index will drop if you use passive tense or certain dull expressions.

The index ranges between 0 and 100. You can interpret the values as follows:

80–100Party!
60–80Lively and engaging
40–60Neutral
20–40On the dry side
0–20Ultradull
 Flesch Reading Ease

Flesch Reading Ease is a classic readability metric. It’s probably the most commonly cited and used of all of them.

It uses the sentence length (number of words per sentence) and the number of syllables per word.

The scores are generally between 0 and 100. You can interpret the values as follows. (See also Flesch, Rudolf. "How to Write Plain English". University of Canterbury.)

ScoreSchool LevelNotes
90–1005th gradeVery easy to read (Easily understood by an average 11-year-old student)
80–906th gradeEasy to read (Conversational English for consumers)
70–807th gradeFairly easy to read
60–708th & 9th gradePlain English (Easily understood by 13- to 15-year-old students)
50–6010th to 12th gradeFairly difficult to read
30–50CollegeDifficult to read
0–30College GraduateVery difficult to read (Best understood by university graduates)
Document InformationInformation about the checked document. For example, this section displays the document name, the number of words and sentences, and other statistical information about your document.
Administrative InformationInformation about the configuration that Acrolinx used for the check. For example, this section displays information about the user who ran the check and the Acrolinx server and client versions.
Checking Information

Information about the check. For example, this section displays the language of the document and the writing guide and term sets that Acrolinx used for the check.

Terminology
You can order terms by Term or Occurrence.

By default, Acrolinx lists terms in the order that they occurred in your content.

Order by terms to group the sentences where each terminology issue occurred into one section. For example, if the deprecated term "utilize" occurs several times throughout your content, you'll see all the sentences in one group.

New Terms

If you checked for new terms, you can click the links in the list of potential terms to open the term contribution form. You might notice a "See also" link underneath some terms.

The "See also" link is there to warn you that there are duplicate terms in your terminology database and that they have contradictory statuses.

For example, suppose that you checked your content with two term sets: "product terms" and "branding". The term "Fruit cocktail" is a deprecated term in "products terms" but preferred in "branding". This could indicate an inconsistency in your policy for that term.

Spelling
You can order spelling issues by Issue or Occurrence.

By default, Acrolinx lists spelling issues in the order that they occurred in your content.

Order by issue to group sentences where each issue occurred into one section. For example, if the spelling issue "pepaya" occurs several times throughout your content, you'll see all the sentences in one group under the header "pepaya".

Grammar and Style
You can order style and grammar issues by Guideline or Occurrence.

By default, Acrolinx lists issues in the order that they occurred in your content.

Order by guideline to group sentences where each issue occurred into one section. For example, if issues related to the "Do you really need this word" guideline occur throughout your content, you'll see all the sentences in one group.

Tone of VoiceIf you've checked for tone of voice, you'll find detailed information on your tone of voice issues. For example, Clarity or conversational tone.